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2 days ago

Dr. John Angelo Lester and the Negro Medical Community

With the popularity of Cinemax’s medical drama, The Knick inflating interest in America’s healthcare during the early 1900’s, I was inspired to share research I started 2 years ago on this subject. Similar to the quasi­historical rendering of a storied New York hospital known as The Knick, my research revolves around the courageous pioneers, powerful leaders and ailing public during a period of general flux in medical education and practice. My research is centered around Nashville, Tennessee and the educator/physician, Dr. John Angelo Lester(1858-­1934).

By 1900, Nashville was a Southern center of healthcare partly due to the Meharry Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical Departments of Central Tennessee College. It is one of two surviving Historically Black Medical Colleges in the US. Meharry was responsible, within twenty four years, for “graduating more than half of the educated colored physicians in the Southern States”. At the turn of the century, the number of Meharry graduates was 410 physicians, dentists pharmacists and others. Its faculty was made up of men who contributed greatly within medical research, construction and public health. I will discuss several of them and reveal the early years of African American medical education and practice.

In 1890, after productive school terms inside and outside of the classroom, Lester graduated from Nashville’s Fisk University. He immediately began the ennobled occupation of teaching. During a two­-year sojourn to the Deep South at Alcorn A&M College, Mississippi to teach anatomy, botany and zoology, his ambition towards the sciences was fortified. As a site of public health, Mississippi suffered for decades after the Civil War with diseases including yellow fever and hookworm. As in urban New York City and throughout the nation, tuberculosis was an imminent public concern in rural Mississippi occupying the minds of every upstart medical practitioner, including J. A. Lester. Additionally, the pressures of post-­Reconstruction Negro life in Mississippi was felt in Alcorn which neighbored the county with the most lynchings during his residence in 1891-3. As paralleled in The Knick’s drama, various social dynamics impacted those endeavoring to elevate medicine during this period.

My research relies completely on digital resources and is limited by our current level of accessibility. Nevertheless, I will uncovered several episodes on the life of Dr. J. A. Lester based on archival resources. This includes the 1893 announcement of Lester’s admission to Meharry Medical Department in the 1st medical journal published by a Negro, The Medical and Surgical Observer by Miles Vandahurst Lynk, MD.

More to come.

1 week ago

11 note(s)

Reblogged From:
afrofuturistaffair
High Quality
theafrofuturist:

AWESOMENESS I am just buzzing this week from excitement, too many amazing things going down over here! First, I saw the Sun Ra Arkestra led by (Uncle) Marshall Allen at the Gehry bandshell in Millennium Park for the Chicago Jazz Festival finale. Blew my mind, rocked my world! Words cannot describe! And a beautiful rooftop after-set, too, where I was honored to meet the musicians and spend time with (cousin) Stan West and family. All in all, a most beautiful evening!
And the beat goes on! Here’s a taste of what’s coming on down the line in the very near future:
• September 25:  Featured Speaker for WebVisions Chicago 2014 on “The MARS Project: Teaching Afro-Futurism as Methodology of Black Liberation”
• October 2 & October 24:  Introduction to Afro-Futurism (with Floyd Webb and Ytasha Womack, October 2) and Introduction to Space Is The Place (October 24) for “Afro-Futurism and Sci-Fi”, Watershed Media Centre, Bristol, UK
• November 1: “Voyaging the Fantastic: Afrosurrealism and Afrofuturism in Wangechi Mutu and Contemporary Black Art”, moderated by Alexander Weheliye with panelists D. Denenge Akpem, Krista Franklin, Cauleen Smith, Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
• November 21: Speaker for Black to the Future conference on “The MARS Project: Teaching Afro-Futurism as Methodology of Black Liberation”, with keynote by Dr. Alondra Nelson, Purdue University, IN
• November 2014: Radio Pacifica Interview with Kali-Ahmet Amen on Afro-Futurism and Black Aesthetics, Atlanta, GA
…and more to come!
So excited and honored to be a part of these brilliant programs. Thanks to all!
Peace and light,
Denenge
 Photo of Sun Ra Arkestra by Ken Weiss


TAKE NOTE of this chunk of afrofuturist academia.

theafrofuturist:

AWESOMENESS
I am just buzzing this week from excitement, too many amazing things going down over here! First, I saw the Sun Ra Arkestra led by (Uncle) Marshall Allen at the Gehry bandshell in Millennium Park for the Chicago Jazz Festival finale. Blew my mind, rocked my world! Words cannot describe! And a beautiful rooftop after-set, too, where I was honored to meet the musicians and spend time with (cousin) Stan West and family. All in all, a most beautiful evening!

And the beat goes on! Here’s a taste of what’s coming on down the line in the very near future:

• September 25:
Featured Speaker for WebVisions Chicago 2014 on “The MARS Project: Teaching Afro-Futurism as Methodology of Black Liberation”

• October 2 & October 24:
Introduction to Afro-Futurism (with Floyd Webb and Ytasha Womack, October 2) and Introduction to Space Is The Place (October 24) for “Afro-Futurism and Sci-Fi”, Watershed Media Centre, Bristol, UK

• November 1:
“Voyaging the Fantastic: Afrosurrealism and Afrofuturism in Wangechi Mutu and Contemporary Black Art”, moderated by Alexander Weheliye with panelists D. Denenge Akpem, Krista Franklin, Cauleen Smith, Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

• November 21:
Speaker for Black to the Future conference on “The MARS Project: Teaching Afro-Futurism as Methodology of Black Liberation”, with keynote by Dr. Alondra Nelson, Purdue University, IN

• November 2014:
Radio Pacifica Interview with Kali-Ahmet Amen on Afro-Futurism and Black Aesthetics, Atlanta, GA

…and more to come!

So excited and honored to be a part of these brilliant programs. Thanks to all!

Peace and light,

Denenge


Photo of Sun Ra Arkestra by Ken Weiss

TAKE NOTE of this chunk of afrofuturist academia.

3 months ago

32 note(s)

Reblogged From:
foxxxynegrodamus

moondancevent:

*Special Note* : King Britt curated an evening called, Bring The Noise : Afrofuturism x Russolo at the <fidget> space in Philadelphia 11.9.13. This Important event laid the foundation for what blossomed into Moondance.

<fidget> space, run and operated by Peter Price and Megan Bridge, hosts an annual experimental music festival, which was focused around the Art of Noise Manifesto in 2013. They approached King to create an evening, celebrating Russolo in an Afrofuturist context.

+ the <fidget> space

8 months ago

7 note(s)

Reblogged From:
scholarshit

Art Papers Magazine "ART X HIP-HOP" Issue AVAILABLE NOW

scholarshit:

image

As artist collaborations between hip-hop artists and visual artists become more and more sophisticated, now is a great time to open a dialog that does more than see hip-hop as novelty, or fine arts as being unapproachable or inaccessible. Considering the two mediums in conversation opens up new levels of critical discourse with both art forms.” – Fahamu Pecou

ART PAPERS “ART X HIP-HOP” issue = #KILLER MIKE x #RASHAADNEWSOME x #KENDRICKLAMAR x #WANGECHIMUTU x #JAYZ x #ROBERT PRUITT x #JAYSONMUSSON x #CAKESDAKILLA x #MARCIAJONES x #BAYETEROSSSMITH … Edited by #FAHAMUPECOU

January/February 2014: ART x HIP-HOP
Letter from the Guest Editor  
Text /
Fahamu Pecou

http://www.artpapers.org/feature_articles/2014_0102-editor.html

Render, R.A.P. Music, and “Reagan”: Killer Mike & the Hip-Hop Imagination   Text / Joycelyn A. Wilson

http://www.artpapers.org/feature_articles/feature1_2014_0102.html

Eye Candy Is Dandy: Rashaad Newsome’s Hip-Hop Heraldry
& the New Black Swag  
Text / Katie Cercone

http://www.artpapers.org/feature_articles/feature2_2014_0102.html

8 months ago

3 note(s)

High Quality
Imamu Amiri Baraka shares a life well lived with Ekere Tallie and family. (at Afrikan Poetry Theater)

Imamu Amiri Baraka shares a life well lived with Ekere Tallie and family. (at Afrikan Poetry Theater)

8 months ago

60 note(s)

Reblogged From:
afrofuturistaffair
atrewn:

Learn and ask questions about Afrofuturism at an upcoming book talk and panel discussion at Northwestern University!

atrewn:

Learn and ask questions about Afrofuturism at an upcoming book talk and panel discussion at Northwestern University!

9 months ago

5 note(s)

Time is ticking for audio producer/visual artist/curator KEVIN SIPP as he moves along his Kickstarter campaign for THE AMAZING ADVENTURES of DAVID WALKER BLACKSTONE.  The 40-page graphic novel of history-related pulp fiction will be printed in February 2014.  Support this.

-from the Kickstarter campaigh profile

David Walker Blackstone is a Victorian Age explorer, reporter and metaphysician. Born into slavery in 1847, Blackstone comes of age a free man in Africa. Returning to America to fight in the Civil War,he afterwards settles in Boston Mass. When a secret society of former abolitionist and post slavery freedom fighters headed by Frederick Douglass come looking for his spiritual services Blackstone soon finds himself  in the midst of a war between men, demons, and Gods for the soul of the world.

Magic, mystery, colonial imperialism and the mystical lives of post-slavery African Americans are at the core of the story.  The universe constructed is a historical and literary mash-up where the influences of Mary Shelly, Herman Melville, Talbot Mundy, Robert E. Howard, Arthur Conan Doyle meet those of Zora Neal Hurston, Alice Walker, Henry Dumas, Toni Morrison and Ishmael Reed.   Ultimately I seek to insert the voice and imagery of African hoodoo heroic life into the age of steam and 19th century occultism.

9 months ago

2546 note(s)

Reblogged From:
vaudevilleplaybook
High Quality
rAwBDK

rAw
BDK

9 months ago

387 note(s)

High Quality
the-science-llama:

Rare New Microbe Found in Two Distant Clean Rooms
A microbe that can survive on very little food and through sterilization processes has only been found in two spacecraft clean-rooms, first in Florida (JPL) — back in 2007 for the launch of the Phoenix Mars Lander — and more recently in South America (ESA).
This new microbe, the Tersicoccus phoenicis, is so different from known organisms that it gets it’s own genus. It seems that this microbe is only found in clean rooms because it gets out-competed by other organisms, get rid of the competition and this genus starts to show up. It might also be in the soil but could just be buried, making it undetectable by the thousands of different types of other organisms.
Read more: NASA, SciAm

___________________________________
#AFROFUTURISM  @ARCDIRECT
Shouts to Reanimator Rap. 
microbes on your earth ###.  
red planet music
red clay

the-science-llama:

Rare New Microbe Found in Two Distant Clean Rooms

A microbe that can survive on very little food and through sterilization processes has only been found in two spacecraft clean-rooms, first in Florida (JPL) — back in 2007 for the launch of the Phoenix Mars Lander — and more recently in South America (ESA).

This new microbe, the Tersicoccus phoenicis, is so different from known organisms that it gets it’s own genus. It seems that this microbe is only found in clean rooms because it gets out-competed by other organisms, get rid of the competition and this genus starts to show up. It might also be in the soil but could just be buried, making it undetectable by the thousands of different types of other organisms.

Read more: NASA, SciAm

___________________________________

#AFROFUTURISM  @ARCDIRECT

Shouts to Reanimator Rap. 

microbes on your earth ###. 

red planet music

red clay

10 months ago

2175 note(s)

Reblogged From:
ladyurduja4xx

(Source: highkeygay)

10 months ago

1686 note(s)

Reblogged From:
sheilastansbury

(Source: yagazieemezi)

10 months ago

527 note(s)

Reblogged From:
whatijustread

newmanology:

Winold Reiss was an artist and graphic designer active in the early 1900s. Ironically, this German immigrant came to fame for his illustrations, portraits, and cover designs during the Harlem Renaissance. He taught and mentored artist Aaron Douglas, and his work appeared on Harlem Renaissance-era book and magazine covers. His portraits of writers, poets, and residents of Harlem for the book The New Negro, edited by Alain Locke in 1925, were very influential. Here’s a selection of illustrated portraits by Reiss from The New Negro. More information on Reiss here.

Portraits, top to bottom:

1) Paul Robeson

2) Zora Neale Hurston

3) Harlem Girl

4) Jean Toomer

5) The Brown Madonna

6) W.E.B. DuBois

7) Elise Johnson McDougald

8) Black Prophet

9) Two Public School Teachers

10 months ago

33 note(s)

Reblogged From:
newmanology

newmanology:

The Harlem Renaissance Illustrations of Richard Bruce Nugent

Richard Bruce Nugent was an author and artist who played an important role in the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and 30s. He was a member of the talented group of writers and artists who created the ground-breaking magazine Fire!! in 1926 (that group included Langston Hughes, Aaron Douglas, Wallace Thurman, and Zora Neale Hurston). Nugent’s provocative short story in Fire!!, “Smoke, Lillies and Jade,” is considered by many to be the first published openly gay story by an African American writer. Nugent also created a small but memorable set of illustrations for various publications during the Harlem Renaissance, including Fire!! and Opportunity. We’ve collected nine of our favorites, courtesy of the Richard Bruce Nugent website. Nugent’s writing and artwork has been collected in an essential book titled Gay Rebel of the Harlem Renaissance: Selections from the Work of Richard Bruce Nugent, by Thomas H. Wirth. The 2004 indie movie Brother to Brother is a fictional portrayal of Nugent’s life.

(Top to bottom):

Cover of Opportunity, March 1926

Illustration from Fire!! magazine (1926)

Untitled

Drawing for Mulattoes—Number 1 (1928)

Drawing for Mulattoes—Number 2 (1928)

Drawing for Mulattoes—Number 3 (1928)

Drawing for Mulattoes—Number 4 (1928)

Illustration for Opportunity, January 1928

10 months ago

5 note(s)

DJ Kenny Parker dug up some tapes of old KRS-One sessions and shared them on the Frozen Files radio show on East Village Radio.

Read more here: http://wp.me/plBE4-2dS

1 year ago

4 note(s)

High Quality
Found inside the 1976 gatefold LP, Songs in the Key of Life.

Found inside the 1976 gatefold LP, Songs in the Key of Life.